When your eye doctor tells you that you require corrective lenses, there could be several different reasons. Some of the most common reasons are: Myopia (nearsightedness) - You can see to read just fine, but as objects get farther away, they become fuzzier. You see the world much as an impressionist painting.

Myopia (nearsightedness) - You can see to read just fine, but as objects get farther away, they become fuzzier. You see the world much as an impressionist painting. Myopia is corrected by using a 'minus' lens (concave lens) of the correct power.

Hyperopia (farsightedness) - You can see fine at distances (perhaps), but things in close are difficult to focus on. This is corrected by using a 'plus' lens of the correct power.

Presbyopia (you're getting older) - Your arms are 'getting too short' to allow you to read comfortably, so you need a corrective lens that allows you to focus on near objects. This is corrected by adding a reading segment to your regular corrective lenses (or, if you don't require a distance correction, by prescribing lenses just for close-up work). Most people past the age of forty require this type of correction.

You may also have astigmatism (with or without any of the above conditions), which causes you to see items somewhat out of focus at any distance. This condition is corrected by adding a 'cylinder', at a particular direction of orientation, to your regular (spherical) corrective lens.


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